FV photo_edited.jpg

Forgotten Voices is a one woman show based on the remarkable true story of Eva Moorhead Kadalie.

Alongside her husband, Clements Kadalie ( the first national black trade union leader of South Africa) Eva fought against racism from the 1920s to 1950s.  They paved the way for Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress.

The play focuses on Eva's challenges, joys and , ultimately, her sacrifices.  History has forgotten Eva as is often the fate of women, especially of colour. Shareesa Valentine gives an electric tour de force performance as Eva. 

Forgotten Voices is written by David Moorhead ( Eva's grandson) and directed by Margaret Connell
.

 

Shareesa Valentine

as Eva

 

 

 

“I am tremendously proud to be playing the role of Eva in Forgotten Voices and

 I’m excited for the world premiere at Hope Mill Theatre.”

 

Shareesa Valentine trained at the Manchester School of Acting and studied under vocal coach Hazel Holder.

 

Television: The Syndicate (BBC); Hollyoaks (Channel 4); Girlfriends (ITV);

From Darkness (BBC);  The Driver (BBC); The Dumping Ground (BBC);

Last Tango in Halifax (BBC); Exile (BBC)

 

Theatre: Shareesa's theatre debut was in the national tour of Kay Mellor’s

 Band of Gold  playing the role of Collette.

 

Film: My Toughest Battle (Working Class Films)

 

Shareesa is represented by Mark Jermin Management.

 

Twitter @ShareesaV

Instagram @sharessa_valentine

 

 

Other voices : Ollie Gomm, Danny Noble, Mike Noble and James Templeton

FV 5.jpg
ForgottenVoices_A5Flyer_FrontAndBack (3) (1)-2.png

Writer’s Note – David Moorhead

 

Welcome to Forgotten Voices.

I can recall, with great fondness, spending school holidays with my grandmother, Eva. She was fascinating,

independent, and so different from anyone else I knew.

In 2005 I made a special trip with my father to his homeland, South Africa. Seeing the land and hearing further

stories made me want to preserve Eva’s story for my own children. Being interviewed by Henry Dee, as part of his PHD research on Clements Kadalie, was a great honour. Henry’s work provided me with even more material.

I knew that if my grandmother’s story were to be adapted for the theatre, it would have to be a one woman

show. Neglected by history, Eva needed to be centre stage and not pushed into the shadows once again.

So, I began to write what has been the most challenging but rewarding play I have ever written.

Director’s Note – Margaret Connell

 

Forgotten Voices, literally, gives a voice to Eva Moorhead Kadalie.  A voice that could so easily have been obscured forever, but for the curiosity and tenacity of her grandson, David Moorhead. Digging beneath family stories and folklore and his own fond memories of his glamorous, funny and enigmatic grandmother, David’s extensive research has uncovered the story of a young woman with a strong sense of injustice and the drive, intelligence and compassion to join the fight against it. 

 

Eva’s story is one of personal sacrifice, loss, grief and regret made bearable by the political and social gains she helped to bring about.  Her work changed the lives of many and paved the way for those that followed. Our task in the rehearsal room has been to give Eva an authentic voice which allows her, quite remarkable, story to be told in a way that cements her place in the history of the emancipation of South Africa.

 

Some of the themes in the play feel uncomfortably close to home nearly a hundred years later in post Brexit Britain, including the normalisation of in work poverty and insecurity and the power of the elite owned press to destroy those who threaten their interests  by challenging the status quo.

FV 1.jpg
FV 4.jpg
FV 3.jpg
FV 2.jpg
ForgottenVoices_A5Flyer_FrontAndBack (3) (1)-1.png

Writer’s Note – David Moorhead

 

Welcome to Forgotten Voices.

I can recall, with great fondness, spending school holidays with my grandmother, Eva. She was fascinating,

independent, and so different from anyone else I knew.

In 2005 I made a special trip with my father to his homeland, South Africa. Seeing the land and hearing further

stories made me want to preserve Eva’s story for my own children. Being interviewed by Henry Dee, as part of his PHD research on Clements Kadalie, was a great honour. Henry’s work provided me with even more material.

I knew that if my grandmother’s story were to be adapted for the theatre, it would have to be a one woman

show. Neglected by history, Eva needed to be centre stage and not pushed into the shadows once again.

So, I began to write what has been the most challenging but rewarding play I have ever written.